Supervisors appoint task force to work on federal health care bill implementation

lakeconews:

LAKEPORT, Calif. – Facing new federal health care requirements for employers, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday appointed a task force of county officials to address the law’s implementation.


Markets in East L.A. get public health makeover
Three years ago, the county Department of Public Health surveyed 1.3 million adults living in the department’s eastern district, which includes Boyle Heights and unincorporated East Los Angeles. The agency found that more than 25% of those polled had been diagnosed with high cholesterol and 30% with hypertension, both often tied to obesity.

A program operated by the UCLA-USC Center for Population Health and Health Disparities and funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute is hoping to change these statistics by giving local markets in East LA a makeover. 

Markets in East L.A. get public health makeover

Three years ago, the county Department of Public Health surveyed 1.3 million adults living in the department’s eastern district, which includes Boyle Heights and unincorporated East Los Angeles. The agency found that more than 25% of those polled had been diagnosed with high cholesterol and 30% with hypertension, both often tied to obesity.

A program operated by the UCLA-USC Center for Population Health and Health Disparities and funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute is hoping to change these statistics by giving local markets in East LA a makeover. 

Can USC Grow without Devouring the Neighborhood?
SC is planning what local officials call the biggest project in South Los Angeles in a generation — 35 acres, complete with restaurants, shops, a six-screen theater, faculty office space and student housing. Will gentrification push local residents out, or is the university — often accused of ignoring its neighbors — be doing them a favor? 
Which Way LA- with Warren Olney 

Can USC Grow without Devouring the Neighborhood?

SC is planning what local officials call the biggest project in South Los Angeles in a generation — 35 acres, complete with restaurants, shops, a six-screen theater, faculty office space and student housing. Will gentrification push local residents out, or is the university — often accused of ignoring its neighbors — be doing them a favor? 

Which Way LA- with Warren Olney 

Silicon Valley power players offer support to Dreamers

univisionnews:

DREAM Act
Silicon Valley titans join the growing number of voices that sympathize with the cause of youth who were brought into the country illegally as children. (Flickr: Jobs with Justice)

By UNIVISION NEWS
Channel: Immigration

A group of Silicon Valley titans is funding efforts to help undocumented students attend college, find jobs and stay in the country, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Read More

A program that turns troubled youths into paramedics is helping to change the lives of young men in Oakland.

California has been a national leader in reducing teen-age pregnancy over the past two decades. But state budget cuts now threaten the programs that helped lead that transformation.


Obesity prevention efforts in schools yield some success

Obesity is still on the rise among California students, but after years of prevention measures in schools, the rate is slowing, new research shows.

Obesity prevention efforts in schools yield some success

Obesity is still on the rise among California students, but after years of prevention measures in schools, the rate is slowing, new research shows.

State statistics show that asthma emergencies send South Bay kids to the hospital between 1.5 and 3 times the county average.

The most affected neighborhoods have three things in common: high numbers of families below the federal poverty line, high proportion of the residents are Hispanic, and dense industrial use or traffic that causes unusually high levels of air pollutants.

State Assemblyman Gil Cedillo plans to introduce legislation that would allow undocumented immigrants to obtain drivers licenses, calling it a matter of public safety. But opponents say the bill rewards law breakers.