Climate Change and Health

Janet Robinson from FHI 360 shares her thoughts on how climate change will impact human health - 

Climate change has brought about severe and possibly permanent alterations to our planet. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) now contends that “there is new and stronger evidence that most of the global warming observed over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities.” These changes have led to the emergence of large-scale environmental hazards to human health mainly in the following areas:

  • Poorer air quality and increased pollution leading to respiratory disease
  • Increase in the spread of infectious diseases including diarrheal disease and insect-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever
  • Reduction in the availability of land for farming due to floods, droughts and other dramatic weather changes, which leads to poverty and malnutrition
  • Increase in the number of extreme weather events, such as floods, droughts and heat waves, which l xeads to substantial morbidity and mortality as well as economic loss
  • More forced migration as families move to find food and water and end up living in crowded and under-resourced refugee camps

The impacts of climate change on health are, and will continue to be, overwhelmingly negative. To make the situation worse, the majority of the adverse effects of climate change are experienced by poor and low-income communities around the world, which have much higher levels of vulnerability to these impacts. This was a hot topic in Durban, where it was argued that the more developed countries should pay “climate debt,” that is, compensate the poor for damages suffered as a result of climate change.

Mobile urban farming
oldboychoi:

abbyjean:

Filmmaker Ian Cheney came to New York in 2009 realizing how difficult it was to have a place to grow food. So he planted his mini farm in his old Dodge and the Truck Farm was born! (via The Pop-Up City)

a raised bed garden in the back of a pickup.

Mobile urban farming

oldboychoi:

abbyjean:

Filmmaker Ian Cheney came to New York in 2009 realizing how difficult it was to have a place to grow food. So he planted his mini farm in his old Dodge and the Truck Farm was born! (via The Pop-Up City)

a raised bed garden in the back of a pickup.

catabolicmystic:

In the United States, when people tell you to “eat your veggies,” they are essentially urging you to take a bite out of California—or, more to the point, take a a big swig of its increasingly scarce water supply.

California, the golden (delicious) state produces 99% US artichokes, 44%…

Organics go mainstream at Fresno State

Could Fresno States new courses in Organic Crop Production change the way agriculture is practiced in California’s Central Valley? Students and professors think so.

“We don’t really come here to debate organic vs. conventional,” Professor Dave Goorahoo said. “The end of the line is, they see it as a business opportunity.”

Governor signs bill to protect farm workers’ right to unionize

 


United Farm Workers President Arturo S. Rodriguez issued the following statement today after Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 126, by state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento). The new law will let the Agricultural Labor Relations Board certify a union if employers’ election violations could affect the outcome of the balloting.

"Today, Governor Brown helped farm workers take their biggest step forward yet in the cause of fair treatment for farm workers by approving his proposal put into legislation by Sen. Steinberg. Under SB 126, if growers cheat during an election campaign, break the law and deny farm workers their right to have a union, then the Agricultural Labor Relations Board can certify the union."

Hmong Farmers in Fresno

After the Vietnam War, an estimated 300,000 Hmong, Mien and Lao political refugees came to the U.S., including 35,000 who settled in Fresno County. Many of the newly-arrived immigrants sought jobs in agriculture and farming. Southeast Asians now own 38% of the farms in Fresno.

Community farming provides micro-enterprise opportunity for refugees

When the International Rescue Committe (IRC) first started the New Roots Community Farm in City Heights, California the intention was to provide refuggees with a source of cheap, fresh, and culturally-relative produce.

But recently, Ernest Eats, a granola company based in Solana Beach, comissioned the community farmers to grow all the mint needed for their over 10,000 dark chocolate mint bars.

“A lot of companies give money to organizations like the IRC,” said Mark Mandel, a co-founder of Earnest Eats. “We wanted to give refugees a micro-enterprise opportunity.”

Read more about this innovative seed-to-market partnership

Back to the Start - Chipotle enlists Willie Nelson’s help to advocate for sustainable farming in the restaurant’s new video ad.

Farm Workers Embark on 200-mile Journey to Demand Fair Treatment. 

STARTED 9AM on Tuesday, Aug. 23 Farm workers begin a Approximately 200-mile pilgrimage up Central Valley to State Capitol demanding ‘Fair Treatment for Farm Workers Now’ SACRAMENTO - Saying the time to act is now, farm workers will begin a 167-mile pilgrimage up the Central Valley to Sacramento to press for enactment of the Fair Treatment for Farm Workers Act. ‘The Fair Treatment For Farm Workers Now’ March begins at 9 a.m. August 23, 2011 in Madera. The march organized by the United Farm Workers, will end on Sept. 4th, labor day. 

mothernaturenetwork:

Will Allen is an urban farmer and the co-founder and CEO of Growing Power, a national nonprofit organization that helps bring healthy food to underserved urban areas. Recognizing that the unhealthy diets common in low-income, urban populations can create problems like diabetes and childhood obesity, Allen began developing farming methods and educational programs that could give these people access to affordable fresh fruits and vegetables.
12 African Americans who are greening the nation

mothernaturenetwork:

Will Allen is an urban farmer and the co-founder and CEO of Growing Power, a national nonprofit organization that helps bring healthy food to underserved urban areas. Recognizing that the unhealthy diets common in low-income, urban populations can create problems like diabetes and childhood obesity, Allen began developing farming methods and educational programs that could give these people access to affordable fresh fruits and vegetables.

12 African Americans who are greening the nation