Long Beach Moves for Better Health

The national dialogue on the obesity epidemic continues, but city leaders in Long Beach are moving past the talk and springing into action with a citywide mission to get people moving. This past month, city officials agreed to pass legislation for a new initiative, called “Move Long Beach,” that would make exercise and nutrition part of the city’s master plan.

Interesting article from the Boston Globe highlights Oakland’s “up and coming food culture”, but fails to mention the impact that such gastronomic endeavors may have on gentrification and displacement. 

mothernaturenetwork:

At the start of the 20th century, streets belonged as much to pedestrians and children at play as to automobiles. By the end of it, stepping into the street in the wrong place was a crime. How did jaywalking become a crime? And how do we decriminalize it?

mothernaturenetwork:

At the start of the 20th century, streets belonged as much to pedestrians and children at play as to automobiles. By the end of it, stepping into the street in the wrong place was a crime. How did jaywalking become a crime? And how do we decriminalize it?

The Growing Popularity of Women-Only Transit
Cities in Japan, Indonesia, India, Brazil, and Russia all have some form of women-only trains, while women-only buses have gained popularity in cities in Guatemala, Mexico, and most recently, Pakistan.

"We decided to have women-only cars to protect women from gropers," says Shiei Kotsu, a spokesman for Midosuji, 

a mixed-gendered subway line that runs through Osaka. 
"The number of groping incidents decreased compared to the time before we had women-only cars, so we think this measure helps curb the problem."
 


But not everyone agrees.





"We think women-only cars came about more for political reasons than protecting women from gropers," says Hiroshi Fukuyama, a 41-year-old office worker in Tokyo who heads an opposition group to women-only trains that boasts about 300 members. What these cars really accomplish, he says, is helping politicians curry favor with voters and the train companies sell ads targeting women.

The Growing Popularity of Women-Only Transit

Cities in Japan, Indonesia, India, Brazil, and Russia all have some form of women-only trains, while women-only buses have gained popularity in cities in Guatemala, Mexico, and most recently, Pakistan.

"We decided to have women-only cars to protect women from gropers," says Shiei Kotsu, a spokesman for Midosuji, 
a mixed-gendered subway line that runs through Osaka. 
"The number of groping incidents decreased compared to the time before we had women-only cars, so we think this measure helps curb the problem."
 
But not everyone agrees.
"We think women-only cars came about more for political reasons than protecting women from gropers," says Hiroshi Fukuyama, a 41-year-old office worker in Tokyo who heads an opposition group to women-only trains that boasts about 300 members. What these cars really accomplish, he says, is helping politicians curry favor with voters and the train companies sell ads targeting women.

Studies show that a walkable urban neighborhoods are GOOD for your health. It’s no wonder that more than three quarters of Americans consider having sidewalks or places to walk a top priority when deciding where to live. 

Studies show that a walkable urban neighborhoods are GOOD for your health. It’s no wonder that more than three quarters of Americans consider having sidewalks or places to walk a top priority when deciding where to live. 

Public Transportation’s Hidden Gender Imbalance

A new Stanford study says women ride transit more often than men. How can we better accommodate their needs?

Recommendations include:

  • Accommodating women with stroller and bags by replacing stairs with ramps, widening aisles or gates, and raising platforms to train level
  • Designing transit stops around schools and parks.  
  • Increase female representation of local, state, and national transportation boards
  • Conduct “gender audits” to ensure women’s needs are meet in transit planning
Parking turned Parklet
The City of Long Beach and local businesses partner to turn street parking into mini parks and parklets.

Parking turned Parklet

The City of Long Beach and local businesses partner to turn street parking into mini parks and parklets.

thegreenurbanist:

Highlights:

  • “In nearly every city and state, bicyclists and pedestrians currently receive less than a fair share of transportation dollars. While 12 percent of trips in the U.S. are by bike or foot, bicycle and pedestrian projects receive less than 2 percent of federal transportation dollars.
  • States with the highest rates of bicycling and walking are also among those with the lowest rates of obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure.
  • In 2009, 40% of trips in the United States were shorter than 2 miles, yet 87% of these trips are by car. Twenty-seven percent of trips were shorter than 1 mile. Still, Americans use their cars for 62% of these trips.
  • While bicycling and walking fell 66% between 1960 and 2009, obesity levels increased 156%.
  • Seniors are the most vulnerable bicyclists and pedestrians. Adults over 65 make up 10% of walking trips, yet comprise 19% of pedestrian fatalities. This age group accounts for 6% of bicycling trips, yet 10% of bicyclist fatalities.
  • Bicycling and walking projects create 11-14 jobs per $1 million spent, compared to just 7 jobs created per $1 million spent on highway projects. Cost benefit analysis show that up to $11.80 in benefits can be gained for every $1 invested in bicycling and walking.
  • On average, the largest 51 U.S. cities show a 29% increase in bicycle facilities since the 2010 report. Cities report that 20,908 miles of bicycle facilities and 7,079 miles of pedestrian facilities are planned for the coming years (much of this contingent upon funding).”

“The data points to one conclusion: Investing in biking and walking projects creates jobs, leads to more people biking and walking, and improves safety and public health,” Alliance President Jeffrey Miller says.”

citymaus:

You just can’t get enough.. reasons to cycle.

from the Bikeminded campaign.

Positive campaigns like this video are desperately needed in the States.